The gentlemen`s agreement of 1907 (1907) was an informal agreement between the United States of America and the Japanese Empire, according to which the United States would not impose restrictions on Japanese immigration and Japan would no longer allow emigration to the United States. The aim was to ease tensions between the two Pacific nations. The agreement was never ratified by the U.S. Congress and replaced by the Immigration Act of 1924. A year later, concessions were agreed in a score of six points. The agreement was followed by the reception of students of Japanese origin in public schools. The adoption of the 1907 agreement stimulated the arrival of “brides of images”, marriages of convenience concluded remotely by photographs. [11] By creating remote marital bonds, women who wanted to emigrate to the United States could obtain passports and Japanese workers in America could earn a partner of their own nationality. [11] As a result of this provision, which helped reduce the gender gap within the Community from a ratio of 7 men to every woman in 1910 to less than 2 to 1 by 1920, the Japan-U.S. population continued to grow despite the restrictions imposed by the Immigration Agreement. The gentlemen`s agreement was never enshrined in a law passed by the U.S.

Congress, but was an informal agreement between the United States and Japan, adopted by unilateral measures by President Roosevelt. It was repealed by the Immigration Act of 1924, which legally prohibited all Asians from emigrating to the United States. [12] President Roosevelt had three goals to resolve the situation: to show Japan that California`s policy did not reflect the ideals of the entire country to force San Francisco to lift the policy of segregation and to find a solution to the problem of Japanese immigration. Victor Metcalf, Minister of Trade and Labour, was sent to investigate the problem and force the repeal of the policy. He did not succeed because local officials wanted Japan to be excluded. Roosevelt tried to put pressure on the school, but she would not give in. On February 15, 1907, the parties reached a compromise. If Roosevelt could guarantee the suspension of Japanese immigration, the school administration would allow Japanese-American students to attend public schools.